Apr 18, 2014

Available April 2014

For Author Info and Review Copies:
Josefine Kals
Publicity Manager
Alfred A. Knopf/Pantheon
(212) 572-2565

The Washington Post:
"Powerful . . . outrageous . . . colorful. Sometimes vivid writing needs no technology other than words."

The Wall Street Journal:
"Highly entertaining. Patton tells the story with gusto, for he has a great tale to tell."

Kirkus Reviews:
"Densely researched, swift-moving account full of fighting detail."

The Boston Globe:
"[A] lively look at the emergence of America's first war correspondents and their dispatches from the front lines. . . .  Patton's spirited chronicle evokes a lost age of journalism."

Booklist:
"Patton offers a fascinating cast of characters as he details major conflagrations and social and technological changes amid the gore of war and the prose of reporters of another era."

Geoffrey Wawro, author of A Mad Catastrophe - The Outbreak of World War I and the Collapse of the Habsburg Empire:
"Patton follows a half-dozen of the 19th century's best war correspondents from the battlefields of the Civil War to the deserts of Central Asia. The portraits are sharply drawn, and some of the scoops, like the 'Bulgarian Horrors' of 1876, still send a chill up the spine."

Carlo D'Este, author of Patton: A Genius for War and Warlord: A Life of Churchill at War, 1874-1945:
"An epic account of how America's forgotten war correspondents risked their lives in some of the world's most dangerous places to report their stories. In this splendidly written book Robert H. Patton has once again proven that he is a gifted writer with a keen eye for chronicling their tales in a way that is both entertaining and insightful."

Publishers Weekly:
"Patton focuses on the war correspondent persona and the band of bold adventurers who earned their keep on the frontlines in this detailed salute. . . . Patton's tribute to these battlefield scribes revives an understanding of why these men mattered."